For Families of Addicts


A lasting recovery requires you to replace harmful habits with healthy alternatives. Family-friendly recreation lets you stay on track with your sobriety while making special memories with the people you care about the most.

Although it’s always a good idea to chat with your family to see what activities are of interest, here are some suggestions to help you start planning your next adventure.

Plant a Garden
Planting a garden is a wonderful family project if you enjoy being outside and working with your hands. Watering, weeding, and harvesting teaches responsibility to kids of all ages. There is also evidence that growing your own food promotes healthier eating habits for the whole family.

If you don’t have the luxury of a big backyard, don’t automatically write off the idea of planting a garden. A small container garden can be placed on your porch or sidewalk. You might not be able to grow all the food your family needs, but you can grow fresh herbs, carrots, onions, and tomatoes with relatively little space.

Take Up Geocaching
Geocaching is the modern-day version of a treasure hunt. Participants use a GPS receiver and other navigational techniques to search for containers known as geocaches that are hidden all over the world. The geocaches contain logs that document the activities of past participants and tiny trinkets for trading.  

In addition to finding geocaches, your family can also try creating and hiding your own geocaches. Picking out trinkets to fill the box and choosing a special hiding place is a great activity for children who are too young to actively participate in the act of finding a geocache. Visit the Geocaching 101 website to learn more.

Be a Tourist in Your Hometown
Traveling to far away locations is certainly exciting, but planning a trip can be time consuming and expensive. As an alternative, why not explore some of the destinations in your community that you’ve previously overlooked?

Zoos, aquariums, museums, art galleries, historical sites, and local landmarks are excellent places to visit for the entire family. If you’re on a tight budget, look for attractions that offer free or reduced-price admission on select days.

Go Camping
Spending time in nature and getting away from electronic distractions offers the chance to reconnect with the people you care about in a more meaningful way. You don’t even have to travel far, since you’ll experience many of the benefits of camping even if you’re simply pitching a tent in the backyard.

Younger children will love to make s’mores, collect fireflies in a jar, or skip rocks along the river. Older children can tell ghost stories, plan a scavenger hunt, or see how many constellations they can find. Photographing the beautiful scenery or playing outdoor games such as cornhole and horseshoes are also great options.

Plan a Game Night
A weekly family game night is sure to provide plenty of special memories. Scrabble, Monopoly, and Yahtzee are classic games that can be enjoyed by players of all ages, but there are plenty of newer board games to consider as well. If you’re not sure what types of games your family might enjoy, see if your local public library has titles to borrow. Many libraries now offer board games, puzzles, and movies to check out in addition to books and magazines.

Add a little extra element of fun to your family game night by purchasing a thrift store trophy that you can award to the winner. Kids love having tangible evidence of their victory, especially when it’s the first time they’ve managed to win against a parent or older sibling.

Have a Movie Marathon
A movie marathon is the perfect chance to share your favorite classic films with your children or to enjoy a series such as Star Wars, Lord of the Rings, or Harry Potter together. With today’s plethora of streaming services, almost any movie you want is available with just a few clicks.

Create a cozy atmosphere by encouraging everyone to change into their pajamas and covering the living room floor with pillows and blankets. Break out the popcorn, soda, and candy, then get ready to enjoy some quality family bonding time.

There’s no greater joy in life than helping others. Volunteering lets you give back to your community, make new friends, and build new skills.

Here are some volunteer ideas that are appropriate for the whole family:

  • Help build a home through Habitat for Humanity.
  • Care for pets at a local animal shelter.
  • Prepare and distribute care packages for the homeless.
  • Organize a canned food drive.
  • Clean up a local park.
  • Help elderly neighbors with yard work.

By Dana Hinders

To learn more about our programs, please visit our website.

Related articles:

What is a functioning alcoholic?Alcoholism can take many forms. While some people end up on the streets or incarcerated as a consequence of their addiction, many others continue to lead outwardly successful lives while struggling with their inner demons.

About High Functioning Alcoholism

Someone with high functioning alcoholism is able to hold down a job, socialize with friends, and maintain intimate personal relationships while demonstrating a pattern of dysfunctional drinking behavior. High functioning alcoholics still suffer from an addiction, but it’s harder to see evidence of the problem unless you’re looking very closely.

A functioning alcoholic may be able to hide the signs of a drinking problem by restricting drinking only to certain times or in certain situations. However, many functioning alcoholics are successful in hiding the signs of their addiction because they have someone in their life who is unconsciously encouraging or enabling the addiction by allowing them to avoid the consequences of their behavior. For example, this person may loan them money when they’ve overspent on alcohol or make excuses on their behalf when they’re too hungover to go to work or attend a social engagement.

High functioning alcoholics are more common than you might expect. Studies estimate that nearly 20 percent  of alcoholics meet these criteria. Of these functioning alcoholics, about 1 in 3 have a multigenerational family history of substance abuse.

High functioning alcoholics are often intelligent, hardworking, and educated people who are actively involved in the community. They may be your coworker, your next-door neighbor, or your best friend.

Problems Associated with High Functioning Alcoholism

Alcoholism is a progressive disease. Over time, tolerance to alcohol increases. This leads to increased consumption, eventually to the point where a high functioning alcoholic starts to experience the adverse lifestyle consequences we all traditionally associate with alcoholism.

In cases where a high functioning alcoholic works in a professional role responsible for the safety and welfare of others, the consequences of substance abuse could be disastrous. For example:

  • A doctor could make a mistake that harms a patient.
  • A lawyer’s mistake could land his client in jail.
  • A CEO’s poor business decisions could put the entire company in jeopardy.

It’s also worth pointing out that even someone who drinks excessively while maintaining the outward trappings of a successful life is still causing a great deal of physical damage. Some of the many health problems associated with alcoholism include:

  • High blood pressure
  • Stroke
  • Obesity
  • Liver disease
  • Pancreatitis
  • Mouth, throat, liver, breast, and/or colorectal cancer
  • Cognitive impairment
  • Gout
  • Seizures
  • Anemia
  • Depression
  • Nerve damage

Signs of a High Functioning Alcoholic

Traditionally, substance abuse disorders are defined by having alcohol-related problems with your personal relationships, career, finances, and/or the law. However, identifying a high functioning alcoholic requires taking a closer look at drinking-related behaviors.

Signs a person may need substance abuse treatment include:

  • Engaging in binge drinking, defined as four or more drinks in a two-hour period for women or five or more drinks in a two-hour period for men
  • Relying on alcohol to feel powerful, confident, and in control
  • Drinking to handle mental health issues such as anxiety and depression
  • Drinking alone
  • Drinking in the mornings
  • Frequently finding yourself drinking more than you intended to
  • Experiencing cravings for alcohol
  • Saying things you didn’t mean while you were drinking
  • Having trouble remembering the details of what happens when you were drinking
  • Being secretive or defensive about alcohol use

Dealing with Denial

Denial is the most common challenge associated with getting a high functioning alcoholic to seek treatment. These individuals honestly believe their alcohol use is under control. Since they’re not unemployed or in trouble with the law, they don’t feel they meet the same standard as the alcoholics portrayed in popular culture. In many cases, they think only someone who has hit “rock bottom” meets the criteria for alcoholism.

Staging an intervention is one tactic that may be effective in getting a high functioning alcoholic to seek treatment. An intervention is a structured meeting where friends and family present their concerns to the person who is abusing alcohol or drugs, offer treatment options, and state the consequences for refusing treatment. For example, a wife may share that she is worried about her husband’s alcohol-related health problems and concerned that the children have noticed their father is absent from social events when he’s been drinking. As a consequence, she might state that she wants a separation if her husband doesn’t seek treatment.

Interventions are not 100 percent effective, but a well-planned intervention using the services of a licensed counselor, social worker, psychiatrist, or psychologist could be just the push your loved one needs to get help.

By Dana Hinders

To learn more about our programs, please visit our website.

Related articles:

rock singerWhen you’re struggling with a drug and alcohol addiction, having sober role models to look up to can help you stay motivated on the path to recovery. If you’re in need of celebrity inspiration, these 7 recovering substance abusers prove that great things are possible when you’re willing to commit yourself to getting the help you need.

1. Robert Downey Jr.
Robert Downey Jr.’s story is one of the most incredible Hollywood comebacks. After being one of the most popular actors in the late 1980s and 1990s, he became virtually unemployable due to his struggles with drugs and alcohol. He was arrested multiple times, served a year in California Substance Abuse Treatment Facility and State Prison, and lost most of his fortune.

Downey has been sober since 2003, relying on a combination of 12-step programs, yoga, meditation, and therapy to stay clean. His role as Iron Man in the Marvel Cinematic Universe officially landed him back on top as an A-list Hollywood celeb.

2. Oprah Winfrey

Oprah Winfrey was raised in poverty by a single teenage mother, but rose above her early struggles to build a massive media empire and become a notable activist/philanthropist. Her influence is so substantial that she’s often referred to as one of the world’s most powerful women.

Winfrey’s struggle with addiction occurred in her 20s, when a man she was dating introduced her to crack cocaine. She kept her substance abuse disorder a secret until spontaneously offering up the information in a 1995 show featuring mothers battling drug addiction. Today, she continues to remind those in recovery that a better future is always possible.

3. Matthew Perry

Best known for his role as Chandler Bing on Friends, Matthew Perry has struggled with addiction to opioids, amphetamines, and alcohol. He attended several different rehab programs in the late 1990s and early 2000s in search of a lasting recovery.

Since getting clean, Perry has channeled his influence into helping others who struggle with addiction. In 2011, he lobbied on Capitol Hill as a celebrity spokesperson for the National Association of Drug Court Professionals. In May 2013, he received a Champion of Recovery award from the White House Office of National Drug Control Policy for creating Perry House, a sober living home located in his former home in Malibu, California.

4. Drew Barrymore

As a popular child actress in a family of Hollywood legends, Drew Barrymore grew up with easy access to addictive substances. She was drinking at 11, using marijuana at 12, and snorting cocaine at 13. By 14, she entered rehab for the first time.

Barrymore has been sober since her late teen years, crediting her recovery to the network of supportive friends she built for herself after becoming legally emancipated at 15. Since getting clean, she’s branched out beyond acting to become a producer, director, author, and cosmetics entrepreneur.

5. Russell Brand

Actor and comedian Russell Brand has been sober since 2002, crediting transcendental meditation and the Focus 12 drug treatment program with helping him to stay clean. In addition to serving as a sponsor for others in recovery, he’s helped bring awareness to the struggles of addiction with the two documentaries: End the Drugs War and Russell Brand: From Addiction to Recovery.

Since getting clean, Brand has turned his attention towards political activism and building a family. He married Scottish lifestyle blogger Laura Gallacher in July 2016 and their daughter Mabel was born later that year.

6. Jamie Lee Curtis

Prescription painkiller addiction continues to rise, affecting many people who would never consider touching illegal drugs. Actress Jamie Lee Curtis developed her addiction to painkillers after a cosmetic surgery when she was 35, eventually mixing the pills with alcohol.

Curtis says her addiction developed as a way to self-medicate her depression, but she was inspired to seek treatment after seeing how her substance abuse was affecting her young daughter. She’s been clean for several years and continues to urge those who are struggling with mental health issues to seek therapy.

8. Keith Urban

Country music star Keith Urban has battled drug addiction since the early 1990s. Urban credits his wife, Nicole Kidman, with helping him to finally kick the habit. After witnessing his behavior spiraling out of control in 2006, Kidman staged an intervention.

Since getting sober, Urban has released 14 number one hit songs and served as a celebrity judge on the hit reality singing competition American Idol. He also become a father of two daughters, born in 2008 and 2010.

By Dana Hinders


To learn more about our programs, please call us at 888-352-3297.

Related articles:

Next Page »