Entries tagged with “Tips for Recovery”.


Two men talking“Continuum of care” is a phrase that’s commonly used in addiction treatment, but many people seeking help for a substance use disorder find themselves wondering exactly what this means.

Essentially, continuum of care refers to having a detailed plan for what services a person needs to help him or her stay sober after seeking residential treatment. This is a system where clients are guided and monitored over time as they progress through all levels and intensities of care. In some cases, this approach may be referred to as a “Recovery-Oriented System of Care” (ROSC).

There’s No Quick Fix

The most common misconception about addiction treatment is that detox and a quick inpatient stay are all that is needed to ensure lasting sobriety. Unfortunately, treating addiction is much more complex.

Addiction is widely recognized as an illness, but it’s not like getting strep throat and having your doctor write a prescription for an antibiotic. It’s more like being diagnosed with diabetes and having your doctor recommend diet changes, exercise, and blood sugar monitoring in addition to your medication.

You can live a full and productive life after being diagnosed with a substance use disorder, but you need to stay on top of your recovery. If you become complacent, you put your sobriety at risk.

Personalized Care Is Essential

No two people with a substance use disorder are exactly alike. Someone who has been abusing drugs or alcohol for many years has very different needs than someone who has only recently developed an addiction. Exposure to trauma, the availability of family support systems, and the presence of a co-occurring mental health disorder are also examples of factors that can widely influence what services are necessary after residential treatment.

Depending upon the client’s specific needs, some services that may be recommended as part of the continuum of care include:

  • Ongoing outpatient counseling
  • Intensive outpatient treatment that offers a more intensive counseling experience but still allows the client to return home each night
  • Sober living homes that serve as an interim step between residential treatment and living independently
  • Participating in 12-Step groups
  • Participating in alumni events sponsored by the residential treatment center
  • Online recovery education programs

Steps in the Continuum of Care

Every case is a little different, but the general steps in the continuum of care are as follows:

  1. Assessment: Determine the nature and extent of the substance use disorder, as well as any chronic illnesses or co-occurring mental health conditions that would complicate care.
  2. Treatment Plan: Develop an evidence-based plan for addiction treatment.
  3. Treatment: Use detox, counseling, and holistic treatment to build the skills necessary for long-term sobriety.
  4. Evaluation: Determine how successful treatment has been in helping to break old behavior patterns.
  5. Case Management: Develop a plan for ongoing care, such as intensive outpatient treatment or sober living.
  6. Extended Care: Provide the services necessary to ease the transition into independent living while addressing physiological, psychological, and spiritual concerns.
  7. Monitoring: Periodically check in with the individual to make sure there are no areas of concern.


Notice that the level of support gradually decreases as the client becomes more adept at practicing the skills necessary to manage the chronic nature of a substance use disorder.

Easing the Transition to Independent Living

Although the specifics are different for each individual, the goal of continuum care planning is to ease your transition from the structured environment of residential treatment to an independent sober life.

Your care team will help you determine what support you need to practice applying the skills you’ve learned to everyday situations. This includes:

Your continuum of care plan can help address specific goals you may have for yourself as you embrace the possibilities of a life without drugs or alcohol. For example:

Providing a Roadmap to Recovery

It may be helpful for you to think of the continuum of care in addiction treatment as a roadmap to recovery. You still need to do the work of building the skills necessary for sober living, but this approach provides you with a detailed plan and actionable steps to guide the process.

However, this does not mean that your continuum of care plan is set in stone. If you suffer an unexpected setback, the plan can be adjusted as needed. There’s no criticism or judgement, only a sincere desire to help you find the best way to move forward with your recovery journey.

By Dana Hinders

 

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family

A lasting recovery requires you to replace harmful habits with healthy alternatives. Family-friendly recreation lets you stay on track with your sobriety while making special memories with the people you care about the most.

Although it’s always a good idea to chat with your family to see what activities are of interest, here are some suggestions to help you start planning your next adventure.


Plant a Garden
Planting a garden is a wonderful family project if you enjoy being outside and working with your hands. Watering, weeding, and harvesting teaches responsibility to kids of all ages. There is also evidence that growing your own food promotes healthier eating habits for the whole family.

If you don’t have the luxury of a big backyard, don’t automatically write off the idea of planting a garden. A small container garden can be placed on your porch or sidewalk. You might not be able to grow all the food your family needs, but you can grow fresh herbs, carrots, onions, and tomatoes with relatively little space.

Take Up Geocaching
Geocaching is the modern-day version of a treasure hunt. Participants use a GPS receiver and other navigational techniques to search for containers known as geocaches that are hidden all over the world. The geocaches contain logs that document the activities of past participants and tiny trinkets for trading.  

In addition to finding geocaches, your family can also try creating and hiding your own geocaches. Picking out trinkets to fill the box and choosing a special hiding place is a great activity for children who are too young to actively participate in the act of finding a geocache. Visit the Geocaching 101 website to learn more.

Be a Tourist in Your Hometown
Traveling to far away locations is certainly exciting, but planning a trip can be time consuming and expensive. As an alternative, why not explore some of the destinations in your community that you’ve previously overlooked?

Zoos, aquariums, museums, art galleries, historical sites, and local landmarks are excellent places to visit for the entire family. If you’re on a tight budget, look for attractions that offer free or reduced-price admission on select days.

Go Camping
Spending time in nature and getting away from electronic distractions offers the chance to reconnect with the people you care about in a more meaningful way. You don’t even have to travel far, since you’ll experience many of the benefits of camping even if you’re simply pitching a tent in the backyard.

Younger children will love to make s’mores, collect fireflies in a jar, or skip rocks along the river. Older children can tell ghost stories, plan a scavenger hunt, or see how many constellations they can find. Photographing the beautiful scenery or playing outdoor games such as cornhole and horseshoes are also great options.

Plan a Game Night
A weekly family game night is sure to provide plenty of special memories. Scrabble, Monopoly, and Yahtzee are classic games that can be enjoyed by players of all ages, but there are plenty of newer board games to consider as well. If you’re not sure what types of games your family might enjoy, see if your local public library has titles to borrow. Many libraries now offer board games, puzzles, and movies to check out in addition to books and magazines.

Add a little extra element of fun to your family game night by purchasing a thrift store trophy that you can award to the winner. Kids love having tangible evidence of their victory, especially when it’s the first time they’ve managed to win against a parent or older sibling.

Have a Movie Marathon
A movie marathon is the perfect chance to share your favorite classic films with your children or to enjoy a series such as Star Wars, Lord of the Rings, or Harry Potter together. With today’s plethora of streaming services, almost any movie you want is available with just a few clicks.

Create a cozy atmosphere by encouraging everyone to change into their pajamas and covering the living room floor with pillows and blankets. Break out the popcorn, soda, and candy, then get ready to enjoy some quality family bonding time.

Volunteer
There’s no greater joy in life than helping others. Volunteering lets you give back to your community, make new friends, and build new skills.

Here are some volunteer ideas that are appropriate for the whole family:

  • Help build a home through Habitat for Humanity.
  • Care for pets at a local animal shelter.
  • Prepare and distribute care packages for the homeless.
  • Organize a canned food drive.
  • Clean up a local park.
  • Help elderly neighbors with yard work.

By Dana Hinders

To learn more about our programs, please visit our website.

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What To ExpectWhen you’ve made the decision to seek addiction treatment, it’s hard to imagine what your life will be like without drugs or alcohol. Although no two people are exactly alike, this article outlines some of the issues you can expect to deal with during your first year in recovery.

Withdrawal

The term withdrawal refers to the physical symptoms you experience after drugs or alcohol leave your system.

Withdrawal symptoms depend upon the substance being abused and your length of use, but often include stomach upset, sweating, headache, anxiety, sleep disturbances, and mood swings. A medical detox helps you avoid dangerous side effects and keeps you as comfortable as possible.

Acute withdrawal symptoms start to taper off as your brain chemistry adjusts to a normal level. However, post-acute withdrawal symptoms can last anywhere from six months to two years. Common post-acute withdrawal symptoms include difficulty with memory and concentration, decreased physical coordination, and trouble managing emotions.

Counseling

Once detox has been completed, counseling is vital part of setting the foundation for long term sobriety. Counseling typically involves a mixture of individual, group, and family sessions. Your counselor may also recommend experiential therapies such as art, music, or equine therapy.

If you suffer from a co-occurring mental health disorder such as depression or PTSD, your treatment plan will need to address both issues simultaneously. Often, people with mental health disorders turn to substance abuse to self-medicate the symptoms of their condition. If their mental health needs aren’t addressed, it becomes extremely difficult to maintain sobriety.

Celebrating 30 Days of Sobriety

Having 30 days of sobriety under your belt is considered a huge milestone. At this time, your withdrawal symptoms have become more manageable and your counseling sessions have provided you with the tools you need to begin a life free from the burdens of substance abuse.

Near the 30-day mark, you’ll likely be transitioning from an inpatient treatment facility to outpatient care. Your counselor will provide you with a detailed aftercare plan to make the adjustment process easier.

Creating a Strong Support System

After leaving an inpatient treatment facility, you’ll want to keep up the recovery momentum by creating a strong support system for yourself. Your facility’s aftercare resources are a good place to start, but you can also turn to support groups such as Alcoholics Anonymous to connect you with people who understand the challenges you’re facing.

People in the early stages of recovery often find that turning to their faith provides comfort. The new friends you meet in worship services and church activities can play a vital role in your recovery by providing encouragement and accountability, even if they have no personal experience with substance abuse.

Building Routines

During the first year of recovery, much of your time will be spent creating a routine for yourself. You’ll need to figure out how to balance work, family, social, and treatment obligations. Using a traditional day planner or a scheduling app on your phone may make it easier to keep track of appointments.

As you’re building a routine for yourself, remember to be realistic about what you can accomplish. Not giving yourself enough time to relax can create stress, which places you at risk of relapse.

Repairing Relationships

When you’re struggling with addiction, it’s easy to inadvertently hurt the ones you love. Restoring trust with friends and family will take time, so be patient with this part of the process.

A sincere apology is always a good place to start, but most people in recovery find that their loved ones respond well to seeing how hard they are working to stay sober. Keep your loved ones informed of your recovery milestones while making an effort to communicate honestly and openly.

Discovering Sober Hobbies

One of the most exciting parts of embracing a sober lifestyle is developing new hobbies. During your first year in recovery, give yourself permission to explore areas of interest—even if they put you outside of your comfort zone.

As you’re thinking about what activities appeal to you, consider aiming for a mix of solo and group hobbies. Solo hobbies such as reading, creative writing, gardening, or painting provide a way to distract yourself when cravings hit. Group activities such as joining a bowling league, volunteering at a local nonprofit, or trying out for a community theater production let you expand your social circle.

Avoiding the Dangers of Overconfidence

As you get closer to the one-year mark, it’s natural to become more confident in your sobriety. Feeling comfortable living clean and sober is an excellent sign, but overconfidence can be a risk factor for relapse.

It’s important to remember that addiction is a chronic illness. Just as someone with diabetes needs to continually monitor their blood sugar, eat right, and exercise, you’ll need to stay on top of your treatment plan to manage your sobriety.

By Dana Hinders

To learn more about our programs, please visit our website.

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