Entries tagged with “st. joseph institute”.


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Meet St. Joseph Institute’s Alumni/Aftercare Coordinator and PRN Counselor, Emily Benjamin. An alumna of St. Joseph Institute (SJI) and a self-professed nerd, Emily brings joy and enthusiasm to her work. Her passion comes in large part from her own experience as a recovering addict and the thrill she finds in being able to live life fully, both at work and at home.

When I asked Emily if I could interview her for the SJI blog, she readily agreed. Read on to discover the LONG list of things Emily does for St. Joseph, her vision for the future of alumni relations at SJI, and what exactly makes her a nerd.

How long have you worked at St. Joseph Institute, and what brought you here?

I have been at SJI as an employee since August 2017. However, my journey takes me back to 2011. In 2011, I came to SJI seeking treatment for my own addiction to heroin and opiate pain killers, via injection. I came here against my will (my parents basically dropped me off and said, “Cya later!”); to say I held on to anger for my first few days of treatment is an understatement. It took me about 3 days until I realized I was grateful to be at SJI. I spent 30 days here and have been clean ever since (May 24, 2011).

At three years clean, I entered my Master’s Program for counseling at Mount Aloysius College.  It was the owner of SJI that advocated on my behalf to get into graduate school even though I had a felony on my record. To my surprise, I was accepted. By my senior year, it was time for an internship. SJI had recently come under new ownership and I did not know if I would be able to obtain an internship there. I tried, anyway. To my surprise, Summit Behavioral Health was happy to take me on for my practicum and internship.

I began on May 26, 2017 (5 years and 2 days to the date of me entering as resident). I interned for 14 months, and then was hired as a PRN counselor. In August, I became the alumni/aftercare coordinator/PRN counselor. Today, I have 6 years and 3 months clean and sober, and have a job at the same facility that gave me my life back! I am beyond grateful.

Give us a brief description of what you do as alumni coordinator.

As the aftercare/alumni coordinator, I set up all aftercare for clients. This includes all counseling services (IOP, PHP), sober living, case management, probation appointments, and all things necessary for a client to leave with a solid aftercare option. I also coordinate events for campus. For example, I recently coordinated a full day of events for National Recovery Month, including the coloring of a banner for overdose victims as well as a balloon release and candlelight vigil; a few days later, we had a campfire featuring the Penn State CRC (Collegiate Recovery Community) alcoholics and addicts, who shared their own addiction stories with our clients while we all enjoyed music and s’mores.

I am also the speaker-seeker and invite speakers, both alumni and outside speakers, to come every Thursday night for our in-house NA/AA meeting. I place phone calls to residents who have discharged, beginning at 7 days post-treatment, followed by 30 days, and then 6 months. I create a database of alumni clients so that I can then invite them to the reunions that we schedule yearly. I also facilitate all orientations for the new residents on campus.

What do you love about your work?

I love working with addicts and alcoholics, because I was in their same shoes. I can speak their language and I can empathize with what they are going through when they get here. Not only that, but I love to help. I just received a phone call yesterday from a mom of a current client, and she said, “My son told me that you give him hope every day.” That’s why I do what I do. To let my clients know there is hope. WE DO RECOVER! 

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The fact that I am able to help these clients understand that their disease does not have to stop them from living a life beyond their wildest dreams gives me a feeling that I cannot describe. I was given a second chance at life through SJI. I could not have gotten clean if I had not started in treatment here just as they are doing. What makes SJI unique is that EACH individual staff member cares about the clients. From the counselors to the cleaning ladies, we all take our time to make sure our clients are comfortable, because we love what we do! 

What do you want to see happen for the alumni in the future?

I would like to see the alumni group increase and empower current residents. I would like to bring in more of an alumni presence into our in-house meetings as well as host events on campus, regularly, where clients are able to see that recovery works and that recovery is awesome. I want the alumni to have a network with each other where they can motivate each other and reach out, all having the common bond of SJI. I want a resident from 2010, when SJI first opened as a treatment center, to be able to encourage a resident in 2017, and vice versa. I want to see SJI hosting events that bring in alumni on a monthly basis, at least.

Why are alumni connections important in recovery?

Evidence. Alumni connections show evidence that treatment WORKS. Alumni connections show that someone else has been in one’s seat and is living a life beyond their wildest dreams, in just a few month’s/year’s time. Alumni connections give clients the ability to see that they are not alone or unique, and that addiction does not discriminate—but neither does recovery!

What do you enjoy doing when you’re not coordinating alumni?

I am a nerd. If I am not reading up on counseling techniques and finding new fun activities to host at SJI, then I am typically hanging out with the ones I love. I have five nieces, one nephew, and one niece/nephew on the way. I like to spend my time with my family, because I remember a time where they were the last people I wanted to see.

My active addiction took me away from enjoying little things, like a walk in a park, or a drive back the mountain. I enjoy alone time so I can read and even catch up on my favorite reality TV shows! I love attending NA meetings and giving back to my sponsees, guiding them through the 12 steps. I love carrying the message of hope in my free time, because any day is a good day to give back!

If you are seeking treatment for yourself or a loved one and would like to know more about the treatment services at St. Joseph Institute, please contact us today. We find great joy in helping our clients find their path to an exciting, sustainable recovery.

By Cindy Spiegel


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People often ask us “what does faith-based mean?”  “Does it mean that you will be preaching at me?”  “Will I be welcome if I don’t participate in organized religion?” “Can you help me re-connect with my faith?”

These are important questions.  In a world where all-to-often we see people seeking to impose their beliefs on others, it is easy to become apprehensive.  When we hear of people claiming to have all of the answers, we become suspect.  When people are condemned or ridiculed because they do not know what to believe, we fear rejection.

Addiction Recovery through Spiritual HealingHopefully, none of these attitudes or actions will be evident at St. Joseph Institute for Addiction.  We want to help people grow spiritually – discover a sense of purpose and meaning for their lives – but we believe this is a journey that each person must travel on their own.  We encourage, we provide information and we share what works for us, but we believe each person must have the freedom to find his or her own answers.

St. Joseph Institute for Addiction is built on a Christian faith tradition.  We believe there is a God and he cares deeply for each of us.  We believe that Jesus has shown us the path by which to live, love, and find meaning & purpose for life.  We believe that if Christianity is to be real, it must guide the way we live and treat one another day-by-day.

St. Joseph Institute for Addiction is non-denominational.  We do not advocate the teachings of a specific church or theology.  There are many Christian traditions and we seek to draw wisdom from many places.  When we discuss forgiveness, we may recount the teachings of the early church fathers, who lived centuries ago.  If we talk about the need for humility in achieving lasting recovery, we may share the words of Andrew Murray, a protestant minister in South Africa.  At Christmas time we adopt a carol for each day, drawing upon Catholic, Episcopal, Baptist, Lutheran and many other traditions. We encourage our residents to discover the place of worship that feels right for them.

In welcoming people of different backgrounds and beliefs, we do not judge or condemn.  We encourage people to find the answers that will guide their life and give them peace.  It is not for us to judge lifestyles, or condemn the choices people have made.  We educate, share the solutions that have helped others, and help people find a better way when their past actions have led to dead-ends.  Very importantly, we challenge people to allow their spiritual self to heal and grow – for all too often addiction shatters that aspect of who they are.

A story is told of St. Francis who lived in the thirteenth century.  Hundreds of friars had joined his community of believers, and he gathered them together and provided instruction before they spread out across Italy.  The commission he gave them was “go forth and spread the gospel, and when necessary use words.”

The message is that faith is most powerful when it is lived.  I hope that our residents see in the staff of St. Joseph Institute for Addiction a spirit of compassion & concern, a sincere commitment to their healing, and a desire to help them grow to experience more of life’s joy and happiness.  If we do our best in this regard, then we are truly Christian.


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For decades addiction treatment has followed a common path; using 12 Step groups and regular meetings for addicts and alcoholics. However, the rapidly expanding knowledge of addiction and the workings of the human mind is leading to new approaches that are proving valuable in treating this chronic disease. While most treatment centers treat only the addiction directly, St. Joseph Institute believes it is just as important to target the underlying issues. We do so through these 5 approaches:

Good nutrition is essential to addiction recovery

    1. A stronger focus on treating the mental health issues (co-occurring conditions) that often cause the addiction, such as anxiety, depression, PTSD, emotional dependency and abuse.
    2. Nutritional therapy to help the brain achieve a better chemical balance.
    3. Stress reduction techniques to improve an individual’s ability to manage life’s challenges.
    4. Better pain management to lessen the need for dangerous drugs.
    5. New technological techniques to help the recovering addict maintain sobriety.

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