Entries tagged with “healing addiction”.


quit smokingAccording to the CDC, about 15 percent of adults in the United States are smokers. However, smoking rates are significantly higher among people who are also struggling with drug and alcohol addiction.

If you’re considering seeking treatment, you may find yourself wondering if it’s best to quit smoking while you’re in rehab or if you should concentrate on beating one addiction at a time. The answer to this question depends on several different factors, including your own personal recovery preference.

The Link Between Smoking and Recovery

Long term tobacco use can cause a wide range of health problems, including emphysema, chronic bronchitis, and heart disease. However, the health benefits of quitting smoking can be seen almost immediately. For example, your heart rate and blood pressure will be back to normal within two hours. Within two to three weeks, your blood circulation and lung function should improve enough that exercising or engaging in physically strenuous activity will be noticeably easier.

The traditional thinking was that quitting smoking could threaten sobriety by increasing the intensity of a recovering substance abuser’s cravings for drugs and alcohol. Today, we know this is simply not true. Quitting smoking will not threaten your recovery and may even be beneficial if you’re suffering from alcoholism and strongly associate drinking with smoking cigarettes.

Since nicotine is an addictive substance, the process of quitting smoking is much like conquering alcohol or drug addiction. Use of nicotine replacement therapy via patch, gum, inhaler, or nasal spray can help keep your nicotine cravings under control. The same coping techniques you learn in recovery to handle cravings for drugs or alcohol can also be used to manage nicotine withdrawal.

Stress Relief and Addiction Recovery

For many people, smoking cigarettes is seen as a way to cope with stress. While it’s true that the experience of getting sober can be stressful, this doesn’t mean that you can’t quit smoking if you wish to do so. To some extent, stress will always be a part of your life. Even when you’re sober, you’ll be dealing with stress in your relationships with family, friends, and co-workers or supervisors.

Quitting smoking while in rehab may give you a chance to come up with healthier ways to handle stressful feelings, such as meditation, deep breathing, yoga, listening to music, or writing about your feelings in a journal. This experience will leave you feeling more confident and in control of your sobriety after your time at the treatment center has passed.

Weight Gain After Quitting Smoking

Nicotine acts as an appetite suppressant, which is why fear of gaining weight is common among people who are interested in quitting smoking. However, this fear is misguided. The vast majority of people who quit smoking gain no more than five to 10 pounds.

If you’re currently malnourished due to your drug or alcohol addiction, gaining a small amount of weight may be beneficial. If you are already at the right weight for your frame, making a point to exercise regularly and avoid overindulging in sweets or processed foods can help prevent any weight gain related to quitting smoking. Experts agree that fear of weight gain shouldn’t be a deciding factor in whether or not you attempt to quit smoking while in recovery.

Quitting Is a Process

If you’ve tried to quit smoking unsuccessfully in the past, you may think it’s not worth the effort to try again. However, quitting smoking is often a process that requires several attempts to be successful.

A study recently published in BMJ Open suggests that it can take up to 30 attempts for smokers to go for one full year without cigarettes. Often, what works best is when a smoker has a powerful and personal reason to want to quit. Seeking treatment for your alcohol or drug addiction and making the decision to begin a fresh chapter in your life may be the mental “push” you need to kick the habit for good.

Choosing the Approach that Works Best for You

There is no one size fits all treatment approach for addiction. If you desire an opportunity to make a completely fresh start, St. Joseph Institute can help you quit smoking at the same time you address your alcohol or drug addiction. However, if you would prefer to focus on overcoming one addiction at a time, our counselors can help you develop a treatment plan that works for your unique needs.

By Dana Hinders

To learn more about our programs or for a campus tour  of St. Joseph Institute, please visit our website.


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A friend recently spent a few days in the hospital for knee surgery.  The doctor’s advice at the time of discharge was simple and encouraging: “Rest, take it easy for a few weeks and before you know it life will be back to normal.”  If only healing from addiction to alcohol & drugs could follow a similar path.

Medical science has confirmed that addiction is a disease.  Changes have occurred within the brain preventing the addict from controlling the impulses and emotions that drive them to use, even though the consequences are obvious and often disastrous.  Addiction to alcohol & drugs is manifested in bad behavior and healing is desperately needed.

Addiction to alcohol & drugs requires big changes

The great difference between a physical disease and a brain disease (such as addiction) is that time is not the critical requirement for healing.  Addicts and alcoholics do not get better simply by resting and waiting.  Time helps, but it is not the foundation of recovery.

Healing from addiction to alcohol & drugs requires change.  The life of the addict or alcoholic must change to remove the patterns, behaviors and habits that have reinforced addiction.  They must be replaced by new and better choices.  The well-worn saying of Alcoholic Anonymous is filled with truth:

Nothing changes if nothing changes”

Old patterns of thinking must be replaced by new thoughts and ideas.  Resentments, anger and low self-esteem must change to forgiveness, acceptance and positive thoughts.  Stress and boredom must give way to self-care, hobbies, and new ways of living that foster greater well-being.  The people who are still using, the places where drugs and alcohol are prevalent, the activities that encourage thoughts of drugs and alcohol, must all be left behind.

In many ways, healing from addiction to alcohol & drugs is harder than healing from a physical injury or a difficult surgery.  It requires a willingness to recognize that life must be different.  It demands the courage to make changes that will establish a life where it is much easier not to drink or use.  This is not a simple task because most of us resist change rather than embracing it.  But recovery from addiction demands no less.  There is no other path to freedom from the destructive power contained within drugs and alcohol other than change.


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