Entries tagged with “Addiction”.


Poverty and addictionThe relationship between addiction and poverty is complicated. Lower income people are slightly more likely to struggle with drug or alcohol abuse, but this doesn’t necessarily mean that poverty causes addiction. In some cases, financial troubles are the result of a substance use disorder.

Poverty Increases Addiction Risk Factors

There are several ways in which financial struggles increase the risk of a person developing a substance use disorder:

  • Poverty increases stress. Stress is well recognized as a risk factor for substance abuse and relapse after treatment. Worrying about how to afford shelter, food, and other basic needs causes a tremendous amount of stress. When you’re struggling to make ends meet, there is a great temptation to turn to drugs or alcohol to temporarily escape from your problems.
  • Poverty increases feelings of hopeless. When meeting daily expenses is difficult, dreams of attending college, buying a home, opening a business, or traveling the world seem impossible. Feeling as though you are powerless over your own future creates a vulnerability to substance abuse.
  • Poverty decreases self-esteem. In a culture that values material possessions and financial success, being poor can feel like a moral failing. This can lead to feelings of guilt, shame, and diminished self-worth. According to Psychology Today, people struggling with low self-esteem have an increased vulnerability to developing substance use disorders.
  • Poverty decreases social support. Having the emotional support of friends and family helps people cope with difficult situations in their lives. However, lower income adults are less likely to have strong social support networks simply because they are expending all of their energy on trying to survive from day to day. For example, a UCLA survey found that lower income adults are less likely to be married even though they value marriage just as much as their higher income peers.
  • Poverty decreases access to healthcare. Although the number of uninsured adults has decreased in recent years, the Henry J. Kaiser Foundation found that 45 percent of uninsured adults lacked coverage simply because the cost was too high. Despite the fact that most of these individuals had at least one working adult in the family, 1 in 5 admitted to foregoing recommended medical treatment due to cost. Access to preventative health care is also severely limited for members of this group. Untreated mental health conditions or chronic illnesses that are poorly controlled can lead to the use of drugs or alcohol to self-medicate symptoms.

One frequently cited example of how poverty affects addiction risk is the Appalachian opioid epidemic. Stretching from the Southern Tier of New York to northern Alabama, Mississippi, and Georgia, the Appalachian region of the United States has struggled with widespread poverty since the early 1900s. The majority of the available jobs are physically demanding, carrying a high risk of injuries despite their relatively low wages. Residents who begin taking opioids to cope with chronic pain from their employment-related injuries often find themselves spiraling into addiction. The effects of substance abuse make it nearly impossible to keep working, thus perpetuating financial struggles.

Addiction Can Cause People to Slip into Poverty

It’s important to remember that people with substance use disorders don’t necessarily develop an addiction simply because they are poor. Someone who is solidly middle class can easily slip into poverty as the result of an untreated drug or alcohol addiction.

As an addiction develops, it becomes increasingly likely that a person will have problems performing at work. This might include arriving late, missing shifts, failing to meet project deadlines, or getting into arguments with colleagues. Eventually, this can lead to job loss.

Being terminated for performance issues will make it harder to find another job. This increases the overall stress in the person’s life and provides an incentive to engage in criminal activity to fund continued substance abuse.

Middle class individuals can also slip into addiction-related poverty by selling assets or dipping into retirement savings to buy drugs or alcohol. Untreated addiction impairs judgement and critical thinking skills, which can lead someone who is normally very financially responsible to burn through decades of accumulated wealth in just a short time.

Promoting Recovery by Treating the Root Causes of Addiction

No two people with substance use disorders are exactly alike. To promote a lasting recovery, it’s vital that treatment plans address the underlying issues contributing to addiction. This could include providing job skills training, affordable housing resources, or access to community-based assistance programs for low-income individuals in addiction to detox and substance abuse counseling.

By working to heal the mind, body, and spirit, St. Joseph Institute helps clients move towards a future free from the burden of addiction. With personalized care, you can regain control of your life.

 

By Dana Hinders

To learn more about our programs, please visit our website.

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dentist officeDuring your next dental appointment, you may be asked about more than your brushing and flossing habits. A recent survey found that 77 percent of dentists now perform substance abuse screenings as part of routine exams.

Why Are Dentists Are Worried About the Addiction Epidemic?

Dentists may not be considered primary care providers, but dental health plays a key role in your overall physical health. This puts dentists in a unique position to fight substance abuse.

Dentists often see patients who have tooth decay due to substance abuse issues. For example, methamphetamines are a leading cause of tooth decay and tooth loss. Alcohol abuse is a primary risk factor for oral cancer. Tobacco use leads to gingivitis and tooth loss.

Addressing the risk of substance abuse is also important because dentists are the second leading prescriber of prescription opioids. This puts them at risk of inadvertently starting someone on the path towards addiction or feeding the habit of someone who already has a full blown opioid use disorder. Drug interactions could be another potential concern, since prescription opioids given for pain relief after a dental procedure could have dangerous interactions when combined with alcohol or illegal street drugs.

What Do Substance Abuse Screenings Look For?

Substance abuse prevention efforts often start the moment a patient walks into the office. Staff members may be looking for signs of potential problems such as:

  • Poor personal appearance, including bloodshot eyes
  • Slurred words, unsteady movements, or other signs of current intoxication
  • A history of broken appointments
  • Repeated requests for unusual prescriptions based on a self-diagnosis
  • Dramatic complaints of severe pain not in line with the issue the patient is being seen for
  • Someone who arrives near closing time seeking opioid prescriptions with the promise to return for an appointment the following day

In addition to a more informal evaluation, the dental hygienist may ask the following questions:

  • How often do you consume alcoholic beverages in a typical week?
  • Have you used tobacco products such as cigarettes or smokeless tobacco in the past three months? If yes, how much and how often?
  • Have you used marijuana more than five times in your life? If yes, when was the last time you used marijuana?
  • Have you felt you should cut down or otherwise control your drinking or drug use?
  • Do you get angry, upset, or annoyed when people ask you about your alcohol or drug use?
  • Do you feel guilty about your drinking or drug use?
  • Have you ever needed a drink or used drugs immediately in the morning to calm your nerves or get rid of a hangover?

Female dentists are more likely to believe addiction screenings are part of their professional responsible than their male counterparts, with 61 percent of women and 52 percent of men conducting screenings.

Age is another factor in how dentists perceive the importance of addiction screening, with 62 percent of dentists over the age of 53 and 47 percent of dentists under the age of 53 conducting screenings.

What Happens Next?

Although the rise of addiction screenings at the dental office should be encouraged, screening people at risk of substance use disorders is only a small part of the battle.

A 2013 study in the Journal of the American Dental Association reports that most dentists who screen patients for substance abuse do not provide referrals to counseling or follow up with patients who exhibit warning signs of addiction. Despite their concern for the well-being of their patients, they feel unqualified or not prepared to offer more extensive drug use prevention services.

Providing continuing education opportunities and additional training to help dentists refer at-risk patients to the appropriate resources would be a cost-effective way to tackle the public health concerns associated with substance use disorders. Until then, however, it’s up to each individual to look out for the signs of addiction and urge friends, family, neighbors, colleges, and others in need to the appropriate evidence-based treatment programs.

Based in Port Matilda, Pennsylvania, St. Joseph Institute for Addiction provides detox and counseling to address the issues contributing to substance use disorders. Our faith-based approach views addiction as physical disease in need of treatment for the mind, body, and spirit. This allows for a solid foundation of sobriety, setting the stage for a future free from the burden of addiction.

By Dana Hinders

To learn more about our programs, please visit our website.

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TeensThe term high functioning addict refers to someone who is outwardly successful while inwardly struggling with addiction. In contrast to the stereotypical vision of an addict as someone who is disheveled in appearance, struggling financially, and frequently in trouble with the law, a high functioning addict appears to have it all together.

People of all ages can be high functioning addicts, but this problem is most often seen with teens abusing drugs or alcohol. Teens can be high functioning simply because they have fewer responsibilities to juggle. However, once a teen heads off to college or the workforce, it will likely become more apparent that a problem exists.

Signs of a High Functioning Teen Addict

Learning to identify the signs of a high functioning addict can help you get treatment for your teen before drug or alcohol abuse takes over his or her life. Here’s what to watch for:

Seeming ill or irritable in the morning. Many teens dislike waking up early for school, but a teen with a drug or alcohol problem may complain of constant headaches, irritability, and fatigue during the morning hours. This could be the signs of withdrawal, which occurs when an addictive substance leaves the body.

A new group of friends with drinking or drug issues. Hanging out with a crowd that likes to “party” indicates that your teen is likely engaged in risky behaviors. Peer pressure can be a powerful motivator for young people.

Avoiding time with parents or concerned adults. A teen who is hiding an addiction may make excuses to avoiding spending time with people who have expressed worry about his or her drug or alcohol use. Your teen may wish to avoid a confrontation or be trying to protect others from knowing the truth.

Unexplained finances. A teen who has no job, but suddenly seems flush with cash may be dealing to support a drug habit. Items that go missing in your home or cash that disappears from your wallet may also indicate your teen is abusing drugs or alcohol.

Losing interest in sober hobbies. If your teen suddenly stops wanting to participate in extracurricular activities at school or past hobbies at home, this may suggest a preoccupation with drugs or alcohol.

An extreme desire for privacy. Although teens are entitled to some privacy, a teen who won’t answer basic questions about his or her whereabouts may have something serious to hide. Monitoring phone and computer usage may be necessary for your teen’s safety.

Convincing an Addicted Teen to Seek Help

A young high functioning addict is likely to be in deep denial. He or she may think that everything is under control, especially when school work and relationships with friends seem to be fine. However, the following signs indicate a problem regardless of how things appear to the casual observer:

  • Your teen believes drugs or alcohol are necessary to relax.
  • Your teen forgets what happened while he or she was under the influence.
  • Your teen makes poor decisions while under the influence, such as drinking and driving.
  • Your teen drinks or uses drugs when he or she didn’t intend to.
  • Your teen develops a tolerance or needs more of the abused substance to experience the same effects.
  • Your teen feels ill or experiences other designs of withdrawal when unable to use.

Planning an intervention is an excellent way to encourage a teen to seek treatment. An intervention is a structured meeting where parents, grandparents, siblings, teachers, coaches, friends, and other concerned parties come together to express their concerns and present a plan for treatment. This is done without judgement or accusation, but consequences are given for refusal. Review our post on How to Plan an Intervention to learn more.

How Treatment Promotes a Lasting Recovery

Addiction treatment depends on specific substance being abused and if a teen has any special considerations such as a co-occurring mental health disorder. However, the process typically begins with medical detox to clear the body of the addictive substance. During detox, a team of medical professionals provide 24/7 supervision and emotional support.

After detox, a teen will enter residential treatment. Individual and group therapy helps a teen learn the coping skills necessary to lead a fulfilling sober life. Holistic treatments such as music or art therapy help reinforce key lessons. Family therapy can help promote positive communication and break patterns of enabling or codependency.

Residential treatment is followed by a detailed aftercare plan that involves outpatient therapy, 12-step groups, and various community-based recovery resources. This helps create the support system necessary for a lasting recovery.

If you’re concerned about your teen’s drug or alcohol use, St. Joseph Institute for Addiction can help. Contact us today to learn more.

By Dana Hinders

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