Miscellaneous


addictionOne of the ways that addiction is described by Alcoholics Anonymous is with the phrase cunning, baffling and powerful.To those living with it, this expression certainly rings true. Someone who is clean and sober may seem to be doing well on their journey, but then they have a slip or even a full-blown relapse.

This type of behavior is very confusing to an addicted persons family members and friends: they likely think that once their loved one goes for treatment, that the problem will be fixed.Unfortunately, addiction doesnt work that way. Its a chronic illness that has all of the qualities listed above, along with infinite patience.

Addiction Treatment Teaches Coping Skills
At the root of many addictions is a desire to avoid emotional pain. If someone is looking for a way to numb themselves or to avoid dealing with something that makes them feel uncomfortable, they can drink, take a pill, snort or smoke something that will help them do that. They dont have to learn how to deal with things going on in their life.

Its not realistic to think that someone who has developed that pattern of living can simply stop using their drug of choice without having something to replace it. For this reason, addiction treatment programs teach coping strategies to their clients that they can use in their chemical-free lifestyle.

Addiction is Cunning
Keep in mind that the addiction is not cured; it is still lying in the background. An addict has to learn that they cant drink again, ever: they cant pick up a drink when they are feeling down or stressed. They learn strategies to avoid these types of situations while in treatment.

Its more challenging to get used to the idea that they cant drink as part of a celebration. If someone has been sober for a time, they might get a little cocky and start thinking that they can have one drink and will be all right. This is the cunning part of their addiction talking to them. It lies in wait, trying to trip them up.

Addiction is Baffling
Unless an addict continues to be diligent about working their program, they will likely relapse. The first part of a 12-step program is to admit that one is powerless over the addiction. The minute someone thinks that they have their addiction beatand that they dont need to keep going to meetings and doing things to stay on track, they are opening the door to letting it take control of their life.

Addiction is Powerful
This disease has the power to change the way a person thinks and how they perceive the world around them. People who are in the throes of an addictive lifestyle will do whatever they need to in order to feed their addiction. The need to use becomes so powerful it takes precedent over anything else.

Addiction is Patient
Someone who is an addict is in recovery, but they are not recovered. The addiction will patiently wait for a chance to step back into their life, if given a chance. The best way to prevent this from occurring is to be constantly vigilant about ones recovery on a day-to-day basis.

In some instances, taking things in smaller chunks of time makes more sense. It may mean looking at life one hour at a time if that is what is needed to stay sober. The 12-step programs offer support and fellowship for people who are experiencing challenges in their journey to stay sober. Many of their members will likely understand exactly what the phrase cunning, baffling powerfulmeans from personal experience, too.

 
To learn more about our programs or for a campus tour  of St. Joseph Institute, please visit our website. You can also call us directly at 877-727-4465. 

VegitablesMany factors contribute to lasting recovery from addiction. St Joseph is dedicated to helping our residents improve their overall health and wellness,and that includes physical well-being. You may be surprised to learn that other aspects of a healthy lifestyle—such as good nutrition and exercise—can be powerful tools in the fight to overcome addiction. Both scientific research and experience attest to the value of these practices:

Because alcohol is high in calories, drinking can make one feel full even if he or she has eaten very little. As a result, many addicts suffer from malnutrition. Alcohol and drugs also make it difficult for the body to absorb nutrients, which can lead to a host of other health problems. Many people who abuse drugs and alcohol have chronic gastrointestinal disorders like diarrhea, constipation, and indigestion.

Recovery is about replacing negative behaviors with positive ones. Both during their time at our center and throughout recovery, residents are encouraged to include healthy eating habits in their journey to optimal health and wellness. In fact, because of the plethora of health problem associated with abusing drugs and alcohol, it’s particularly important for those in treatment to eat a diet that is high in nutrients and can help rebuild damaged organs and tissues. A diet with the right types of high protein and carb-rich foods can even ameliorate some of the symptoms of withdraw.

For example, drugs and alcohol prevent the body from processing tyrosine and tryptophan, two amino acids that are responsible for the production of neurotransmitters that control mood. Tyrosine is related to alertness, so eating protein-rich foods like meat, poultry, seafood and tofu can help those in recovery replenish helpful neurotransmitters and feel more active and alert. Tryptophan can have a calming effect and makes it easier to sleep; it is found in bananas, milk, turkey and sunflower seeds. On the other hand, both sugars and caffeine contribute to mood swings and should be avoided.

This site offers tips and healthy meal plans for those recovering from addiction:

http://alcoholicsvictorious.org/faq/rec-diet

St. Joseph Institute would like to share a recent interview by Kurt Angle, alumnus of our inpatient program. During this candid conversation with ESPN Radio, Kurt reveals the extent of his addiction, as well as the pains and triumphs of finally achieving sobriety, noting St. Joseph Institute as the rehab facility that saved his life and recommending it to anyone looking for substance treatment.

Earlier in 2016, Kurt was inducted into the International Sports Hall of Fame. Kurt has been a professional wrestler in the WWF, WWE, and TNA, racking up 13 world championships, including an Olympic gold medal. In fact, he has been described as one of the greatest wrestlers of all time. In the midst of his career, Kurt battled with substance use and has since made a full, sustained recovery. We congratulate Kurt and encourage you to read and watch the interview about his inspirational journey.

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