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Man using a cell phoneBeing in recovery means rethinking every aspect of your daily routine, including how you use social media. Your time online has the potential to either be a tool for sobriety or a threat to the recovery process.

Advantages of Social Media in Recovery

In some cases, social media can be an aid in the recovery process. Social media might be beneficial if:

  • You use social media to stay connected to family and friends who live far away but want to help support your recovery.
  • You use social media to get support when you’re struggling with specific issues related to your sobriety.
  • You participate in private accountability groups.
  • You read and share information about the nature of addiction.
  • Social media allows you to pursue specific hobbies that relieve stress, such as following craft sites to get ideas for new projects or swapping recipes with a cooking buddy.

Disadvantages of Social Media in Recovery

Social media may seem like an inescapable part of modern life, but unhealthy online behaviors can be a threat to your sobriety. It might be wise to limit your use of social media if:

  • Seeing pictures from parties or memes about drinking and drug use triggers cravings.
  • You’re being contacted by people who aren’t supportive of your recovery efforts.
  • You feel depressed and discouraged when you compare yourself to posts in your newsfeed.
  • You’ve become a victim of cyberbullying.

Substitute addictions or addiction replacements are a common problem in the early stages of recovery. This involves replacing alcohol or drugs with destructive behaviors such as binge eating, gambling, compulsive shopping, or Internet addiction.  If you haven’t addressed the unconscious emotional issues contributing to your addiction, you may be at risk for developing a substitute addiction to social media.

Not all Sites Are Created Equally

Not all social media sites are used in the same way. For example, LinkedIn is a valuable tool for a job search after leaving residential treatment and Pinterest can help inspire you to find new hobbies. However, one recent study found that cyberbullying is most common on Instagram, Facebook, and Snapchat.

If you’re looking a positive social media environment, you may find it more useful to gravitate towards specialized networks for people in recovery. For example, Sober Grid is a social networking app for people in recovery that uses your smartphone’s GPS capabilities to let you connect with people near you who are also in recovery from drug or alcohol addiction. You can use the site to find a ride to a 12-Step meeting, get help dealing with cravings, or find people with similar interests.

If you’re struggling to figure out how to socialize with drugs or alcohol, Meetup.com may be able to help. This site lets you search for local book clubs, workout buddies, cooking groups, and any other special interest meeting you can imagine. If you’re not sure what type of sober socializing you’d be interested in, the “Popular Meetups Nearby” feature lets you browse through what’s going on in your area.

Dating in the early stages of recovery is typically discouraged. However, if you’re feeling confident in your sobriety and ready to start searching for someone special, Sober can help. This dating site caters to sober singles, so you can connect with people who share your commitment to recovery.

Saying Safe on Social Media

When you’re using social media as a recovery tool, consider the following safety tips:

  • Popular social media sites are often targets for fake news, financial scams, and/or identity theft schemes. Review USA.gov’s online safety tips to learn the best ways to protect yourself.
  • Employers often check social media for information about prospective candidates. If you’d prefer to keep your recovery private, consider using an alias and avoiding posting photos or personal details that may confirm your identity.
  • If you’re arranging to meet a person you’ve connected with online, always plan to meet in a public location. Bringing a trusted friend along or informing someone of where you’re going and who you plan to meet are also good safety precautions.

Making the Decision that’s Right for You

Deciding what role social media should play in your recovery takes a great deal of self-reflection. You need to be honest with yourself about your online habits and how you feel after using social media. If you’re undecided, consider doing a “digital detox” where you abstain from social media for one week, one month, or another predetermined time period. Take notes on your thoughts and recovery progress during this time, then use these insights to figure out the approach that’s right for you.

By Dana Hinders

To learn more about our programs, please visit our website.

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Two men talking“Continuum of care” is a phrase that’s commonly used in addiction treatment, but many people seeking help for a substance use disorder find themselves wondering exactly what this means.

Essentially, continuum of care refers to having a detailed plan for what services a person needs to help him or her stay sober after seeking residential treatment. This is a system where clients are guided and monitored over time as they progress through all levels and intensities of care. In some cases, this approach may be referred to as a “Recovery-Oriented System of Care” (ROSC).

There’s No Quick Fix

The most common misconception about addiction treatment is that detox and a quick inpatient stay are all that is needed to ensure lasting sobriety. Unfortunately, treating addiction is much more complex.

Addiction is widely recognized as an illness, but it’s not like getting strep throat and having your doctor write a prescription for an antibiotic. It’s more like being diagnosed with diabetes and having your doctor recommend diet changes, exercise, and blood sugar monitoring in addition to your medication.

You can live a full and productive life after being diagnosed with a substance use disorder, but you need to stay on top of your recovery. If you become complacent, you put your sobriety at risk.

Personalized Care Is Essential

No two people with a substance use disorder are exactly alike. Someone who has been abusing drugs or alcohol for many years has very different needs than someone who has only recently developed an addiction. Exposure to trauma, the availability of family support systems, and the presence of a co-occurring mental health disorder are also examples of factors that can widely influence what services are necessary after residential treatment.

Depending upon the client’s specific needs, some services that may be recommended as part of the continuum of care include:

  • Ongoing outpatient counseling
  • Intensive outpatient treatment that offers a more intensive counseling experience but still allows the client to return home each night
  • Sober living homes that serve as an interim step between residential treatment and living independently
  • Participating in 12-Step groups
  • Participating in alumni events sponsored by the residential treatment center
  • Online recovery education programs

Steps in the Continuum of Care

Every case is a little different, but the general steps in the continuum of care are as follows:

  1. Assessment: Determine the nature and extent of the substance use disorder, as well as any chronic illnesses or co-occurring mental health conditions that would complicate care.
  2. Treatment Plan: Develop an evidence-based plan for addiction treatment.
  3. Treatment: Use detox, counseling, and holistic treatment to build the skills necessary for long-term sobriety.
  4. Evaluation: Determine how successful treatment has been in helping to break old behavior patterns.
  5. Case Management: Develop a plan for ongoing care, such as intensive outpatient treatment or sober living.
  6. Extended Care: Provide the services necessary to ease the transition into independent living while addressing physiological, psychological, and spiritual concerns.
  7. Monitoring: Periodically check in with the individual to make sure there are no areas of concern.


Notice that the level of support gradually decreases as the client becomes more adept at practicing the skills necessary to manage the chronic nature of a substance use disorder.

Easing the Transition to Independent Living

Although the specifics are different for each individual, the goal of continuum care planning is to ease your transition from the structured environment of residential treatment to an independent sober life.

Your care team will help you determine what support you need to practice applying the skills you’ve learned to everyday situations. This includes:

Your continuum of care plan can help address specific goals you may have for yourself as you embrace the possibilities of a life without drugs or alcohol. For example:

Providing a Roadmap to Recovery

It may be helpful for you to think of the continuum of care in addiction treatment as a roadmap to recovery. You still need to do the work of building the skills necessary for sober living, but this approach provides you with a detailed plan and actionable steps to guide the process.

However, this does not mean that your continuum of care plan is set in stone. If you suffer an unexpected setback, the plan can be adjusted as needed. There’s no criticism or judgement, only a sincere desire to help you find the best way to move forward with your recovery journey.

By Dana Hinders

 

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Poverty and addictionThe relationship between addiction and poverty is complicated. Lower income people are slightly more likely to struggle with drug or alcohol abuse, but this doesn’t necessarily mean that poverty causes addiction. In some cases, financial troubles are the result of a substance use disorder.

Poverty Increases Addiction Risk Factors

There are several ways in which financial struggles increase the risk of a person developing a substance use disorder:

  • Poverty increases stress. Stress is well recognized as a risk factor for substance abuse and relapse after treatment. Worrying about how to afford shelter, food, and other basic needs causes a tremendous amount of stress. When you’re struggling to make ends meet, there is a great temptation to turn to drugs or alcohol to temporarily escape from your problems.
  • Poverty increases feelings of hopeless. When meeting daily expenses is difficult, dreams of attending college, buying a home, opening a business, or traveling the world seem impossible. Feeling as though you are powerless over your own future creates a vulnerability to substance abuse.
  • Poverty decreases self-esteem. In a culture that values material possessions and financial success, being poor can feel like a moral failing. This can lead to feelings of guilt, shame, and diminished self-worth. According to Psychology Today, people struggling with low self-esteem have an increased vulnerability to developing substance use disorders.
  • Poverty decreases social support. Having the emotional support of friends and family helps people cope with difficult situations in their lives. However, lower income adults are less likely to have strong social support networks simply because they are expending all of their energy on trying to survive from day to day. For example, a UCLA survey found that lower income adults are less likely to be married even though they value marriage just as much as their higher income peers.
  • Poverty decreases access to healthcare. Although the number of uninsured adults has decreased in recent years, the Henry J. Kaiser Foundation found that 45 percent of uninsured adults lacked coverage simply because the cost was too high. Despite the fact that most of these individuals had at least one working adult in the family, 1 in 5 admitted to foregoing recommended medical treatment due to cost. Access to preventative health care is also severely limited for members of this group. Untreated mental health conditions or chronic illnesses that are poorly controlled can lead to the use of drugs or alcohol to self-medicate symptoms.

One frequently cited example of how poverty affects addiction risk is the Appalachian opioid epidemic. Stretching from the Southern Tier of New York to northern Alabama, Mississippi, and Georgia, the Appalachian region of the United States has struggled with widespread poverty since the early 1900s. The majority of the available jobs are physically demanding, carrying a high risk of injuries despite their relatively low wages. Residents who begin taking opioids to cope with chronic pain from their employment-related injuries often find themselves spiraling into addiction. The effects of substance abuse make it nearly impossible to keep working, thus perpetuating financial struggles.

Addiction Can Cause People to Slip into Poverty

It’s important to remember that people with substance use disorders don’t necessarily develop an addiction simply because they are poor. Someone who is solidly middle class can easily slip into poverty as the result of an untreated drug or alcohol addiction.

As an addiction develops, it becomes increasingly likely that a person will have problems performing at work. This might include arriving late, missing shifts, failing to meet project deadlines, or getting into arguments with colleagues. Eventually, this can lead to job loss.

Being terminated for performance issues will make it harder to find another job. This increases the overall stress in the person’s life and provides an incentive to engage in criminal activity to fund continued substance abuse.

Middle class individuals can also slip into addiction-related poverty by selling assets or dipping into retirement savings to buy drugs or alcohol. Untreated addiction impairs judgement and critical thinking skills, which can lead someone who is normally very financially responsible to burn through decades of accumulated wealth in just a short time.

Promoting Recovery by Treating the Root Causes of Addiction

No two people with substance use disorders are exactly alike. To promote a lasting recovery, it’s vital that treatment plans address the underlying issues contributing to addiction. This could include providing job skills training, affordable housing resources, or access to community-based assistance programs for low-income individuals in addiction to detox and substance abuse counseling.

By working to heal the mind, body, and spirit, St. Joseph Institute helps clients move towards a future free from the burden of addiction. With personalized care, you can regain control of your life.

 

By Dana Hinders

To learn more about our programs, please visit our website.

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