Benefits of exercise in recoveryBeing in recovery involves rethinking your entire approach to life, which means the early stages of recovery are the perfect time to begin a regular exercise regimen. Making physical activity a daily part of your life offers multiple benefits for the body, mind, and spirit.

1. Exercise Gives You a Natural High.

It may sound hard to believe if you’ve always been a bit of a couch potato, but exercise has been scientifically proven to give you a natural high. Physical activity increases serotonin, dopamine, and endorphins. These chemicals help boost your mood, much like the high from using drugs or alcohol.

It doesn’t matter how strenuous your exercise regimen is either. Even a brisk walk after dinner can be helpful, so feel free to start small and gradually increase your physical activity as your strength and stamina improve.

2. Exercise Relieves Stress.

Balancing work, family, friends, and recovery can certainly be stressful at times. Exercise is an excellent natural stress reliever because it’s essentially meditation in motion. If you’re focused on shooting hoops, playing tennis, or mastering new dance moves, you can’t worry about problems in other areas of your life.

After concentrating solely on your body’s movements for 30 minutes to an hour, you’ll have a new perspective on what’s bothering you. The break from your troubles will also keep you from making rash decisions you may regret in the future.

3. Exercise Lets You Manage Anger and Frustration.

When you’re in recovery, it can be challenging to find a way to deal with unpleasant emotions without turning to drugs or alcohol. Exercise can help you work out your frustration and anger in a productive way.

If you’re using exercise to manage anger and frustration, however, it may be best to avoid aggressive team sports such as hockey or football. The natural aggression in the game may exaggerate your emotional response. Try running or lifting weights instead.

4. Exercise Promotes More Restful Slumber.

In today’s fast-paced world, trouble sleeping is very common. Being in recovery can make insomnia worse when the body is struggling to adjust to life without drugs and alcohol. Getting regular exercise will help balance your circadian rhythms and burn off excess energy, both of which will help you sleep better. This will improve your mood as well as promote healing of the damage caused by past substance abuse.

For maximum benefits, aim to get at least 150 minutes of exercise per week. Ideally, it’s best to exercise five to six hours before you want to go to bed. This is the timeframe when the body’s temperature drops after exercising, which will make it easier to fall asleep. If it’s not possible to exercise at this time, a morning workout is the next best option. Exercising three hours or less before bed can actually overstimulate the heart, brain, and muscles—making it harder to go to sleep.

5. Exercise Helps You Deal with Co-Occurring Mental Health Disorders.

If you’ve been diagnosed with depression, anxiety, or another co-occurring mental disorder, the mood boosting benefits of a regular workout routine may help you feel better. Working out won’t necessarily be a substitute for your medication, but getting moving may help you feel more like yourself again.

Yoga’s mental health benefits are particularly well documented. By teaching participants to focus on their breathing and tune out distractions, yoga promotes focus and relaxation. If you’re hesitant to try yoga because you don’t think you’re flexible enough, look for a certified instructor who can help you modify poses to work with a more limited range of motion.

6. Exercise Fills Up Idle Time.

Boredom is a common trigger for cravings when you’re in the early stages of recovery, so anything that keeps you busy is going to be beneficial. For maximum benefit, consider taking an organized fitness class or scheduling time at the gym as a set part of your daily routine.

7. Exercise Expands Your Social Circle.

Making friends as an adult can be difficult, but you may find that it’s easier to expand your social circle if you’re exercising regularly. Joining a gym or participating in team sports is a great way to meet new people if you’re feeling lonely from no longer associating with friends who encourage unhealthy lifestyle choices.

If you’re worried about approaching someone new, keep it simple and ask for tips on improving your form or advice on healthy eating. Having a common interest to guide your conversation will help break the ice as you get to know each other.  

By Dana Hinders

To learn more about our programs, please call us at 888-352-3297.

Related articles:


Print pagePDF pageEmail page

Medication assisted treatment MATMedication assisted treatment (MAT) for opioid addiction has been endorsed by the American Medical Association, the American Academy of Addiction Psychiatry, and the American Society of Addiction Medicine. However, MAT is often misunderstood by those in search of effective recovery options.

What Medications Are Used to Treat Opioid Addiction?

The most common medications used to treat opioid addiction are:

  • Methadone
  • Buprenorphine (sold under the brand names Suboxone and Subutex)
  • Extended release naltrexone (sold under the brand name Vivitrol)

Both buprenorphine and methadone are classified as essential medicines by the World Health Organization. Methadone is given as an oral tablet, liquid, or wafer from licensed opioid treatment clinics only. Patients must visit the facility daily to receive treatment. Buprenorphine can be given as a tablet, a film placed under the tongue or against the inside cheek, or an implant inserted in the arm. Only specially credentialed doctors can prescribe buprenorphine.

Are There Any Side Effects?

Constipation and sweating are the most frequently reported side effects of treatment, followed by nausea, back pain, chills, weight gain, insomnia, and decreased libido. Side effects may decrease in severity as your body adjusts to the medication, but you should discuss any concerns about side effects with your healthcare provider.

The medications used to treat opioid addiction could interact with some prescription medications, such as SSRI antidepressants and those used to treat HIV. You will need to tell your healthcare provider about all of the medications you are currently taking to determine if medication assisted treatment is right for you.

Patients who suffer from liver disease require close monitoring white undergoing MAT.

Is MAT Safe for Pregnant Women?

MAT is considered safe for pregnant women, with much less risk to the unborn baby than continuing to abuse heroin or other opioids during pregnancy. Both methadone and buprenorphine will show up in a drug screen after a woman gives birth, but no action will be taken if your healthcare provider verifies that the medications are being used as part of your substance abuse treatment plan.

Since buprenorphine is a newer medication and has been the subject of less research, methadone is considered the standard choice for pregnant women. Buprenorphine is considered a Pregnancy Category C medication, which means the risk of adverse effects has not been ruled out.

After giving birth, women on low doses of methadone may be able to breastfeed. If you wish to breastfeed, this should be discussed with your healthcare provider.

How Long Does Medication Assisted Treatment Last?

The duration of MAT for opioid addiction is decided on a case-by-case basis. In most cases, the goal is to taper off the dosage slowly as you become more comfortable and confident in your sobriety. However, patients with a history of relapse can safely take their medication on a long-term basis if they are properly monitored.

There are three phases of MAT:

  • Induction: A medically monitored beginning of MAT, which occurs when the patient is in the early stages of withdrawal.
  • Stabilization: An adjustment of the dosage until the patient is reporting no cravings and experiencing few, if any, side effects.
  • Maintenance: When the patient is doing well with a steady dose of medication, options for ongoing recovery are discussed. This can include either tapering off the medication altogether or continuing indefinitely to prevent relapse.

Isn’t MAT Simply Substituting One Addiction for Another?

People who’ve struggled with opioid addiction are often leery of medication assisted treatment because they believe that it’s best to get sober without any pills in their system. However, the medications used for treating opioid addiction do not result in getting high. The dosage is intended only to reduce cravings and withdrawal symptoms by balancing the brain circuits affected by addiction. This gives your brain time to heal as you work towards recovery.

Medication assisted treatment does not interfere with cognitive functioning. This means you can work, attend school, care for your children, and enjoy relationships with friends and family while receiving treatment.

Can Medications Cure Opioid Addiction?

Treatment for opioid addiction should combine medications with counseling to address the underlying issues contributing to substance abuse. Medications on their own are not a sufficient treatment for addiction, but using medication assisted treatment has been proven to improve retention rates in counseling programs.

Addiction is a chronic illness, so someone who suffers from opioid addiction will never be fully cured in the traditional sense. However, treatment can help an addict learn to manage cravings to live a full and productive life.

By Dana Hinders


Print pagePDF pageEmail page

rock singerWhen you’re struggling with a drug and alcohol addiction, having sober role models to look up to can help you stay motivated on the path to recovery. If you’re in need of celebrity inspiration, these 7 recovering substance abusers prove that great things are possible when you’re willing to commit yourself to getting the help you need.

1. Robert Downey Jr.
Robert Downey Jr.’s story is one of the most incredible Hollywood comebacks. After being one of the most popular actors in the late 1980s and 1990s, he became virtually unemployable due to his struggles with drugs and alcohol. He was arrested multiple times, served a year in California Substance Abuse Treatment Facility and State Prison, and lost most of his fortune.

Downey has been sober since 2003, relying on a combination of 12-step programs, yoga, meditation, and therapy to stay clean. His role as Iron Man in the Marvel Cinematic Universe officially landed him back on top as an A-list Hollywood celeb.

2. Oprah Winfrey

Oprah Winfrey was raised in poverty by a single teenage mother, but rose above her early struggles to build a massive media empire and become a notable activist/philanthropist. Her influence is so substantial that she’s often referred to as one of the world’s most powerful women.

Winfrey’s struggle with addiction occurred in her 20s, when a man she was dating introduced her to crack cocaine. She kept her substance abuse disorder a secret until spontaneously offering up the information in a 1995 show featuring mothers battling drug addiction. Today, she continues to remind those in recovery that a better future is always possible.

3. Matthew Perry

Best known for his role as Chandler Bing on Friends, Matthew Perry has struggled with addiction to opioids, amphetamines, and alcohol. He attended several different rehab programs in the late 1990s and early 2000s in search of a lasting recovery.

Since getting clean, Perry has channeled his influence into helping others who struggle with addiction. In 2011, he lobbied on Capitol Hill as a celebrity spokesperson for the National Association of Drug Court Professionals. In May 2013, he received a Champion of Recovery award from the White House Office of National Drug Control Policy for creating Perry House, a sober living home located in his former home in Malibu, California.

4. Drew Barrymore

As a popular child actress in a family of Hollywood legends, Drew Barrymore grew up with easy access to addictive substances. She was drinking at 11, using marijuana at 12, and snorting cocaine at 13. By 14, she entered rehab for the first time.

Barrymore has been sober since her late teen years, crediting her recovery to the network of supportive friends she built for herself after becoming legally emancipated at 15. Since getting clean, she’s branched out beyond acting to become a producer, director, author, and cosmetics entrepreneur.

5. Russell Brand

Actor and comedian Russell Brand has been sober since 2002, crediting transcendental meditation and the Focus 12 drug treatment program with helping him to stay clean. In addition to serving as a sponsor for others in recovery, he’s helped bring awareness to the struggles of addiction with the two documentaries: End the Drugs War and Russell Brand: From Addiction to Recovery.

Since getting clean, Brand has turned his attention towards political activism and building a family. He married Scottish lifestyle blogger Laura Gallacher in July 2016 and their daughter Mabel was born later that year.

6. Jamie Lee Curtis

Prescription painkiller addiction continues to rise, affecting many people who would never consider touching illegal drugs. Actress Jamie Lee Curtis developed her addiction to painkillers after a cosmetic surgery when she was 35, eventually mixing the pills with alcohol.

Curtis says her addiction developed as a way to self-medicate her depression, but she was inspired to seek treatment after seeing how her substance abuse was affecting her young daughter. She’s been clean for several years and continues to urge those who are struggling with mental health issues to seek therapy.

8. Keith Urban

Country music star Keith Urban has battled drug addiction since the early 1990s. Urban credits his wife, Nicole Kidman, with helping him to finally kick the habit. After witnessing his behavior spiraling out of control in 2006, Kidman staged an intervention.

Since getting sober, Urban has released 14 number one hit songs and served as a celebrity judge on the hit reality singing competition American Idol. He also become a father of two daughters, born in 2008 and 2010.

By Dana Hinders

 

To learn more about our programs, please call us at 888-352-3297.

Related articles:


Print pagePDF pageEmail page

Next Page »