Taking Time Off Work to Attend Rehab

One of the most common fears people struggling with drug and alcohol addiction have is how to seek treatment without putting their job at risk. While this issue does need to be handled carefully, evidence suggests that seeking treatment is much more likely to provide a boost to your career as opposed to simply ignoring your substance abuse problem. When you’re sober, you’re free to focus your attention on achieving your career goals instead of dealing with the effects of your addiction.

Sharing Sensitive Information with Your Employer and Coworkers
How you choose to handle explaining the reason behind your absence is entirely up to you. Some people decide to be totally forthcoming about their need to seek treatment, while others keep the information strictly on a need-to-know basis.

If you work in a close-knit environment, your supervisor and coworkers may already suspect that you need help based on their observations. If so, they’re likely to be supportive of the efforts you’re making in taking control of your addiction. Even though it can be scary to admit vulnerability, being upfront about your need to seek treatment can be seen as a sign of your integrity and honesty, as well as your commitment to your employer. As an added benefit, your supervisor may be able to connect you to additional resources through the company’s Employee Assistance Program.

Seeking addiction treatment is nothing to be ashamed of, but keeping your decision confidential might be in your best interests if you don’t feel your colleagues will be supportive. If you’re worried about protecting your privacy, you can work with the human resources department directly to minimize the number of people who know the reason for your absence. A doctor’s note explaining the reason for your absence may be required, but your doctor is ethically bound to protect your privacy. All he or she needs to do is certify that your need for time off work is due to a legitimate medical condition. Others who don’t need to know this confidential information can simply be told you’re taking a leave of absence to attend to some personal matters or that you’re using accrued vacation time.

Legal Protections for People Seeking Addiction Treatment
While absence from work due to substance use doesn’t qualify for legal protection, seeking addiction treatment is protected under the Family and Medical Leave Act of 1993 (FMLA). Taking leave under FMLA allows you to request an unpaid leave of absence of up to 12 weeks in a 12-month period. Employers are not allowed to terminate a worker simply because he or she has requested FMLA leave for a qualifying condition.

There are specific requirements you must meet to take advantage of FMLA. You must have worked for your employer for at least 12 months, have worked for a minimum of 1,250 hours over the past 12 months, and be employed at a location with at least 50 workers employed by the company within 75 miles.

If your employer violates the FMLA, you can seek legal action. A settlement may include compensation for lost wages, loss of future earning potential, and any applicable liquidated damages.

Alcohol and drug addiction are also considered disabilities under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). Current substance abuse isn’t protected, but employers must provide reasonable accommodations if you’re sober and in a recognized treatment program. This often includes flexible scheduling, with options such as leaving early, working from home, being allowed to refuse overtime to attend counselling or support group meetings, and taking an unpaid leave of absence.

If your employer violates the ADA, you can file a federal suit. You won’t receive monetary damages, but your employer can be ordered to make the necessary accommodations to be in compliance.

Concerns Related to Performance Issues
If your employer has a drug and alcohol use policy in place that was clearly communicated to all employees and is consistently enforced, you can be terminated if there is proof you violated the policy. Your employer can also terminate your position for performance issues related to your drug and alcohol use. This might include:

  • Being late to work
  • Missing too much work
  • Inappropriate behavior towards coworkers or clients
  • Ignoring safety precautions or causing accidents
  • Mishandling sensitive information
  • Theft or misuse of company resources

If there is concrete proof of performance issues, it legally doesn’t matter what the cause of the issue is. For this reason, it’s in your best interests to seek addiction treatment before your drug or alcohol misuse starts affecting your job performance.

By Dana Hinders


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7 tips for healthy eating in recoverySubstance abuse has long been linked to nutritional deficiencies. The empty calories in wine, beer, and liquor reduce the desire to consume a healthy diet, while the urge to seek a high from illegal drugs often causes substance abusers to skip meals in search of their next fix.

If you’re in recovery, following a balanced diet can help repair the past damage caused by substance abuse. Proper nutrition will also help alleviate symptoms of withdrawal (such as headaches and stomach upset), reduce cravings, and boost your energy levels.

Here are seven tips for healthy eating in recovery:

1. Drink Lots of Water
In detox and the early stages of recovery, dehydration is a common concern. It’s recommended that you drink 1/2 ounce to 1 ounce of water for each pound of body weight. For example, a 150-pound woman should try to drink 75 to 150 ounces of water per day.

If you don’t like the taste of plain water, try making infused water by adding fresh fruit and herbs to a pitcher of water and chilling it for several hours. Watermelon and mint, citrus and cucumber, or strawberry and basil are a few popular combinations you can try.

2. Eat Your Fruits and Veggies
Current federal dietary guidelines recommend that you fill half your plate with fruits and vegetables for each meal. This is great advice for everyone, but it’s particularly helpful for people in recovery.

Citrus fruits are rich in antioxidants, which help boost your immune system, restore the appearance of your skin and hair, and protect the body from free radical damage. Grapefruit is especially beneficial during detox and early recovery because it helps regulate your digestive system while lowering cholesterol and preventing kidney stones.

Any vegetable you enjoy is a good choice, although leafy greens like kale, spinach, romaine, bok choy, swiss chard, collards, and dandelion provide a source of chlorophyll to help rid the body of harmful toxins and promote detoxification in the liver. If you’re not a salad lover, try adding leafy greens to a smoothie. Combine 1 cup greens, 1 cup liquid, and 1 ½ cups fruit. The fruit will give your finished drink a sweet taste that masks the flavor of the greens.

3. Choose Whole Grains
Whole grains are those that contain the bran, germ, and endosperm instead of losing nutrients while being refined. Whole grains are packed with insoluble fiber, which keeps you from being constipated and helps control your appetite. They’re also high in antioxidants and packed with essential nutrients.

Whole wheat bread, brown rice, oatmeal, and air-popped popcorn are the most common types of whole grains. However, more adventurous eaters may want to branch out and try options like quinoa, bulgur, millet, and buckwheat.

4. Add Wild Salmon as a Source of Lean Protein
Protein helps recovering substance abusers repair damaged cells. Wild salmon is an excellent protein source because it is rich in anti-inflammatory omega-3 fatty acids. Salmon can be baked, broiled, or grilled and paired with a side of mixed veggies or brown rice for a filling and delicious meal option.

5. Snack on Seeds and Nuts
Almonds, walnuts, and sunflower seeds are wonderful choices for snacks since they have enough protein to regulate your blood sugar and keep your mood stable throughout the day. Try making your own homemade trail mix by combining your favorites with dried fruit and a bit of whole grain granola. One serving of trail mix is approximately ¼ cup. You can keep premeasured portions in plastic sandwich bags to avoid overeating.

6. Limit Consumption of Fast Foods, Sugary Sweets, and Caffeine
During recovery, one common mistake that people make is replacing their abused substance with fast food or sugary sweets. These foods create temporary feelings of satisfaction, but can result in weight gain along with making you feel bloated and sluggish. It’s best to reserve these items for special occasions only.

You may also want to avoid beverages containing caffeine during your recovery. Caffeine provides a temporary energy boost, but can result in mood fluctuations that make it harder to resist cravings for alcohol or drugs.

7. Keep a Food Journal
Nutritionists often recommend keeping a food journal to learn more about how different foods affect your mood and energy levels. This exercise can be useful in identifying areas where you need to improve your nutrition, as well as strategies that work well in reducing your cravings.

By: Dana Hinders


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2017 Alumni Reunion is Saturday, May 27!

We’re excited to announce plans for our upcoming alumni reunion.

Alumni are invited to bring one guest (adults only) for dinner, fellowship, and a bonfire. If you’re musically inclined, bring an instrument to join in the live music.

Come on out for some good, clean, sober fun and reflect on your journey of recovery!

Please RSVP using this link.

 

Schedule of Events

2:30-3:00pm: Alumni and guest sign-in at gate

3:00-4:00pm: Meet and Greet In Appalachian

4:15-5:00pm: Clean Time Countdown of alumni and current residents in Appalachian

5:15-6:15pm: Dinner and mingle time in Bald Eagle

6:30-7:30pm: Campfire NA meeting at Fire Pit (Guest speaker: Travis from Lewistown)

7:30-8:30pm: Bonfire and live music with s’mores and hot chocolate

8:30-8:45pm: Alumni and guest sign-out at gate

To keep up-to-date, like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter!


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